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The Prowler

The student news site of de Toledo High School

The Prowler

Book Club Reads Banned Books

Book+bans+lead+to+censorship+of+important+racial+and+gender+issues+in+the+world.+Banned+Books+Week%2C+Oct.+1-7%2C+2023%2C+provides+opportunities+to+spotlight+attempts+to+censor+books+in+schools+and+libraries.
Alexis Gavin
Book bans lead to censorship of important racial and gender issues in the world. Banned Books Week, Oct. 1-7, 2023, provides opportunities to spotlight attempts to censor books in schools and libraries.

In certain schools, books are being banned due to a fear that it will negatively affect students. Books that explain racism, gender, sexuality, and idenity are being banned because they might “mislead” students. To Kill a Mockingbird and Gender Queer: A Memoir are banned in schools because of the discussion of racism and lgbtq identities. 

Without learning and reading about the history, struggles, and overall knowledge of different races and sexualities, the world will never be an equal place for minorities. It’s important that students learn about minorities at a young age to educate them on social issues to bring awareness and equality in schools and society. 

I sat down with English Department Chair Ms.Golden to discuss her beliefs on the matter of banned books: 

“I find it appalling on so many levels– when you ban you can peak interest, but the deeper thing is to remember that books are truth tellers, and of course we have to be careful about the age of the children, but young people deserve the truth. Teachers and librarians choose great books; we don’t choose bad books, we choose good books that we vet as being windows or mirrors into our lives, so when parents are afraid of this, it makes me incredibly sad. 

“The trans- and homophobia going on in Florida is particularly shocking because the whole question of why do young people need to know about homosexuality… well these people might have two mommys or two daddys, or those young people might be gay or trans. So this idea that you only discuss sexuality and gender when you are at a certain age makes no sense to me at all. 

“The idea that a teacher can’t have the picture of her wife on her desk because that’s ‘grooming’ a young child is just so appalling to me. It’s an extreme absurdity, and banning books that talk about slavery, the truth about the treatment of Native Americans…things that are true…[T]he only way you heal and recover is when you deal with the truth so it doesn’t repeat itself.” 

At de Toledo, we are fortunate that book club is able to discuss and read books on any topic that might be deemed “sensitive.” As president, I hope to educate my peers on the importance of reading and learning the truth in the classrooms. 

I started the book club to create a place where people with a love of reading could connect. I wanted to spread literacy around the school to encourage the love of books. I felt there wasn’t enough appreciation of reading and I knew the perfect way to do so was to create a book club. 

My goal was to create a safe space where people could come together to enjoy reading and talking about books. I wanted to create a tight knit community where people could go to feel accepted by those around them and take a break from the problems of the world. 

Reading is an escape. It makes people feel less alone and I knew it was essential that people had a place to go to when they needed a break from the world around them. Reading fills people’s imaginations and creates connections with those that share the common love of reading.

If people are struggling academically or socially, I want book club to be a place where people who want can come together to help one another feel less alone. No matter the differences, everyone here has one thing in common: a love for reading. 

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About the Contributor
Alexis Gavin
Alexis Gavin, Opinion Editor
Alexis Gavin is a senior at de Toledo. She has been writing for The Prowler for four years, and is excited to continue writing about current events and school life.

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